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Want to Know Why Travel is Political? Check it Here

A lot of people assume “politics” as being a very crucial and difficult topic. But, the truth us, we’re communicating with and influenced by politics almost every day. And this doesn’t stop even when you are on trip.

I’m not letting you know this so as to positively give my political opinions with you; rather, I’m composing this article so as tos show you just how related governments and trip really are, in dreams that maybe you’ll end sending these “stick to travel” type of information to the travel bloggers you follow.

Travel is political, and below are the reasons why:

Here are just some of the ways in which travel is political:

1. Passports and visas

If you are moving from your home country and passing a border into a different one, you are engaging in a political act.

If you have your own passport, that passport is a political document; in the US, it says directly on the front of the ID that it’s given to you by the United States Department of State – and on the succeeding page it even says that it is “U.S. Government Owned.”

The habits and laws by which we are permitted action out of our own countries and into others are, by their very nature, political. Whether you need to apply for a visa earlier or just get a stamp at a border is the effect of complex political alliances.

2. Breathing in a global society

This year has been a great example of how the world now works (more or less) as one huge global society. When a pandemic started circulating around the world, we all observed the impacts. Borders closed, flights were delayed, and international travel became simply hard for a lot of poeple.

3. Travel and regional markets

Speaking of things like sustainable travel, you can’t overlook how your travels (and your tourism dollars) while staying in a bed in a box influence local market, also.

In a lot of places, tourism is a great industry; in some countries few people, it might be the *primary* industry. It’s consequently natural to think that tourism (and the promotion of it) are not directly related to politics.